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Oxford Women's Health - Preserving Future Fertility

Latitude Magazine December/January 2017

For young woman facing a diagnosis of endometriosis, fertility is usually the last thing on their minds. But according to specialists at Oxford Woman's Health, being proactive in dealing with pelvic pain can help to preserve future fertility.

"Unfortunately women who have endometriosis have a higher chance of experiencing fertility problems," says Richard Dover, a clinician at Oxford Woman's Health and specialist at Genea Oxford Fertility. "We need to ensure that future fertility is considered throughout our conversations and we need to treat the pain." 

Mr Dover says the subject of fertility often arises when mothers who have experienced endometriosis and fertility issues come into appointments with their daughters. "Mothers who have had endometriosis are very switched on about potential fertility. Their daughters don't always appreciate how precious it is." 

It is thought that as many as 10% of women may have endometriosis. In many of these women, the disease will be chronic and progressive. Early diagnosis and intervention will improve symptoms, reduce the chances of developing chronic pain and minimise potential fertility issues.

Mr Dover stresses that the management of endometriosis does not always include surgery, although it does have an important role. He advocates a multidisciplinary approach, which includes the options of medical and surgical therapies, but also addresses the role of diet, physiotherapy and education.

"We've developed a multidisciplinary team at Oxford Women's Health that includes nutritionists; a physiotherapist with an interest in pelvic pain; a clinical psychologist; clinicians who are actively involved with Endometriosis New Zealand; and a group of senior gynaecological surgeons who are all recognised for their advanced laparoscopic surgical skills." 

"We want to eradicate endometriosis but not at the risk of damaging future fertility. Endometriosis is not a black and white issue so we offer a range of surgical, medical and holistic options.  

"And we have access to our own world class facility clinic, Genea Oxford Fertility. A large proportion of patients at Genea Oxford Fertility have endometriosis so we've developed a special protocol to manage their fertility treatment."

"We can tailor our treatment plans and pain management to suit each individual. It's an example of how we use our gynaecological expertise to treat endometriosis proactively and improve fertility outcomes for out patients."

If you suspect you have endometriosis, or a problem conceiving, call Oxford Women's Health on 03 379 0555. 

 

Non-invasive prenatal genetic testing now available to South Island women

2 July 2015

Pregnant women in the South Island now have access to the fastest, most accurate, non-invasive prenatal genetic testing in New Zealand.

GeneSyte is a simple blood test that offers a 99 per cent detection rate for Down syndrome without the risk of miscarriage involved in more invasive prenatal tests.

Available exclusively at Genea Oxford Fertility in Christchurch and at consultations at the Mornington Health Centre in Dunedin, the test also picks up many other chromosomal abnormalities*. Because samples are sent to Australia rather than the US or Asia, results are available within 10 working days.

“GeneSyte is the latest in prenatal chromosomal testing and comes without the need for invasive procedures such as amniocentesis. It’s fantastic to be able to provide the test here in Christchurch to give pregnant women and couples faster, safer and more accurate peace of mind,” Genea Oxford Fertility Clinical Director Richard Dover said.

“One of the many other advantages of this test is that parents-to-be receive definitive yes and no answers rather than information on a sliding scale,” Mr Dover said.

The test, also known as Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS), involves taking a blood sample from a woman, who is between 10 and 20 weeks pregnant. The fetal DNA in the blood is then analysed using advanced molecular biology techniques.

Because of the important implications of the results, Genea Oxford Fertility offers a clinical consultation as part of the $775 fee for the test.

Recently established at Forté Health in Christchurch, Genea Oxford Fertility is a partnership between Australian fertility specialists Genea and the local, experienced team of health professionals at Oxford Women’s Health. Genea is a pioneer in prenatal screening with more than 28 years' experience in the field.

To find out more about GeneSyte call Genea Oxford Fertility on 0800 377 894 or talk to your family doctor.

* GeneSyte can detect abnormalities relating to chromosomes 21, 18 and 13, and the X and Y chromosomes. Down syndrome, Edwards syndrome, Patau syndrome and Turner syndrome are among the conditions that can be detected through the test.

 

Christchurch specialist, a leading light in women’s health

25 June 2015

A Christchurch gynaecologist is taking a leading role in improving the lives of women with incontinence and prolapse across Australasia.

John Short, a gynaecologist at Oxford Women's Health, Christchurch, has recently been elected to the prestigious Executive Board of the UroGynaecological Society of Australasia (UGSA). He is the only New Zealand representative on the committee, joining five specialists from Australia.

It is the first time a Christchurch specialist has served on the Board and Short says it's an honour to be involved in helping to set standards for health care and advance the science of urogynaecology.

Urogynaecology is a branch of gynaecology, focusing on incontinence, prolapse and associated problems. UGSA members include gynaecologists and specialists in fields such as urology and physiotherapy.

Short says about 25 per cent of New Zealand women suffer from incontinence (loss of bladder control) and vaginal prolapse (bulging). The costs to the New Zealand economy have been estimated at $8 billion per year in direct health care, lost productivity, carer support and other costs.

While they are not fatal conditions, they can make life miserable, Short says. "Unfortunately many women do not seek treatment. There has been a tendency to accept these problems as a normal consequence of childbirth and ageing and many women persevere with their symptoms thinking there is no help available."

At Oxford Women's Health, Short provides a range of non-surgical and surgical treatments for his patients.* He says it's important all women experiencing incontinence or prolapse are thoroughly assessed and treatments are tailored to their needs.

"Whilst obviously not the most glamorous area of medicine, this work is hugely satisfying," Short says. "These problems can severely affect all aspects of life, from work to recreational activities to interactions with friends and family. The sense of satisfaction from fixing someone's problems and helping them get back to enjoying life is enormous."

Short is also a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist at Christchurch Women's Hospital. He is a RANZCOG training supervisor and an advisor to the Health and Disability Commissioner.

* O&G Magazine recently published an article by John Short, summarising the non-surgical management of prolapse. The link is https://www.ranzcog.edu.au/editions/cat_view/38-publications/409-o-g-magazine/410-o-g-magazine-issues/719-vol-16-no-1-autumn-2014.html